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Checklists

Checklists

What must the academic regulations contain?

You can use the checklist to check whether the academic regulations that you are working on comply with all the relevant requirements. The checklist has been drawn up based on relevant ministerial orders pertaining to higher education, and on other guidelines at the Faculty of Arts such as the review of our degree programmes (click here for more information). Please note that special rules apply to the degree programme in conference interpreting (see ministerial order) and Erasmus Mundus programmes (see ministerial order), which are subject to additional ministerial orders.

The overall framework

Academic regulations at the Faculty of Arts:

  • Should have a long life, applying for the full duration of the degree programme in question before any changes are made.
  • Should be efficient in terms of the resources invested by the administration and the department concerned.
  • Should encourage students to spend more time and energy on their studies.
  • Should be clear and comprehensible.  

About the degree programme

  • The academic regulations must contain a description of:
  1. The potential for employment
  2. The learning outcomes to be achieved during the degree programme
  3. The courses contained in the degree programme
  4. The aim of the degree programme
  • The academic regulations must also contain the degree programme’s qualification profile divided into the following categories: knowledge, skills and competences (click here for more information).
  • The qualification profile must comply with the qualification framework for higher education.
  • When changes are made in the academic regulations, it is necessary to check that the overall qualification profile is still aligned with the academic objectives for the individual exams.    

Admission requirements

Bachelor’s degree programmes

Admission to Bachelor’s degree programmes requires an upper-secondary school education and compliance with specific admission requirements, cf. the Ministerial Order on Admission to and Enrolment on Bachelor’s Degree Programmes at Universities (bacheloradgangsbekendtgørelsen).

The admission requirements can be found at www.bachelor.au.dk and are not stated in the academic regulations.    

Bachelor’s supplementary subjects

The admission requirements for Bachelor’s supplementary subjects must be stated in the academic regulations.

Master’s degree programmes

Admission to Master’s degree programmes requires a relevant Bachelor’s degree or another relevant Danish or international degree of the same level. The academic regulations must state:

  • Which relevant Bachelor’s degrees give the right of admission to the Master’s degree programme in question.
  • Which special admission requirements students must comply with on a Bachelor’s degree programme in order to gain admission to the Master’s degree programme concerned (in terms of courses or course elements and the number of ECTS credits attached to them).

Master’s supplementary subjects

The admission requirements for Master’s supplementary subjects must be stated in the academic regulations.

Professional Master’s degree programmes

  • Admission to professional Master’s degree programmes is only possible for applicants who have completed at least:

    • A relevant Bachelor’s degree programme
    • A relevant professional Bachelor’s degree programme
    • A relevant medium-cycle higher education degree
    • A relevant diploma degree programme completed in the form of a regulated course of study, or
    • A relevant degree programme at the same level from a university outside Denmark
  • Applicants must have at least two years of relevant work experience after completing the degree programme on which their admission is based.
  • If a part-time degree programme is conducted in English (either in its entirety or to a significant extent), applicants must have provided documentary evidence that their knowledge of English corresponds at least to level B by the time the programme starts.

  • The university may require applicants to pass a special test.    
  • The admission requirements for the degree programme must be stated in the academic regulations.    
 

Transitional rules, phase-out plan and framework for completion

The academic regulations must contain:

  1. Transitional rules describing how to transfer students from old academic regulations to new ones.
  2. A plan of when the last teaching and exams will be conducted in individual courses under the previous academic regulations.
  3. A framework for the completion of the degree programme.

SNUK will normally produce a draft of these provisions.    

Progression

Bachelor’s degree programmes and Bachelor’s supplementary subjects

  • Bachelor’s degree programmes must be rounded courses of study which expand the level of education on which admission was based.

  • The programme must be structured with a view to ensuring both academic alignment and progression.    

  • The courses contained in the degree programme must ensure that students can choose either to study one of several Master’s degree programmes, or to start utilising the professional skills they have acquired on their Bachelor’s degree programme.

  • Progression requirements must not be included in the programme. One exception to this rule is the demand for the language skills that will be needed to read the material included in subsequent areas of study.        

Master’s degree programmes and Master’s supplementary subjects

  • Master’s degree programmes must be rounded courses of study which expand the knowledge and insight gained by the students during their Bachelor’s degree programme. They qualify the students for admission to the PhD degree programme.

  • The programme must be structured with a view to ensuring both academic alignment and progression.

  • The courses must ensure that the students can normally choose between various profiles providing them with the skills needed in a variety of professional functions.    
  • Progression requirements must not be included in the programme. One exception to this rule is the demand for the language skills that will be needed to read the material included in subsequent areas of study.    

Professional Master’s degree programmes

  • Professional Master’s degree programmes must have the same level as Master’s degree programmes.
  • Professional Master’s degree programmes are independent, rounded study programmes.

Structure

Bachelor’s degree programmes

These degree programmes consist of 180 ECTS credits (+ any introductory courses of 30/60 ECTS), including 15 ECTS for the Bachelor’s project and at least 10 ECTS for elective courses and a course dealing with the philosophy of science (normally 10 ECTS of general studies).

A Bachelor’s degree programme normally consists of:    

  • Core subject: 135 ECTS

  • Supplementary subject: 45 ECTS

  • However, there are a few exceptions involving a core subject of 180 ECTS and no supplementary subject

  • Internationalisation courses are placed on the third semester and generate 10 ECTS credits (graded and assessed internally).

Bachelor's supplementary subjects

Bachelor’s supplementary subjects consist of 45 ECTS credits, with 15 ECTS credits on the fifth semester. Tailored Bachelor’s supplementary subjects also have either 3X10 ECTS or 10 ECTS+20 ECTS on the sixth semester.

As far as possible, academic regulations should be aligned to ensure that there are no structural barriers preventing the co-teaching of Bachelor’s supplementary subjects and Bachelor’s degree programmes.

Master’s degree programmes

These degree programmes consist of 120 ECTS credits.

  • Line A: Core subject: 120 ECTS

  • Line B: Core subject: 75 ECTS + Master’s supplementary subject: 45 ECTS (+ possible extension of 30 ECTS credits if the student is studying a core subject at another faculty)

  • The profile semester is placed on the third semester and normally consists of the following three options:

    • Profile course (20 ECTS) + thesis preparation (10 ECTS)

    • International elective (30 ECTS)

    • Project placement (30 ECTS) or project placement (20 ECTS) + thesis preparation (10 ECTS)

  • Master’s degree programmes at the Danish School of Education and Master’s degree programmes without a qualifying Bachelor’s degree programme do not normally have a profile semester

  • All Master’s degree programmes must contain a thesis preparation course on the third semester – either as part of the 30 ECTS project placement, or as a 10 ECTS course, or as part of another course

 

Master's supplementary subjects

Master’s supplementary subjects consist of 45 ECTS (+ possible extension of 30 ECTS credits if the student is studying a core subject at another faculty). As far as possible, academic regulations should be aligned to ensure that there are no structural barriers preventing the co-teaching of Master’s supplementary subjects and Bachelor’s degree programmes/Master’s degree programmes.

Professional Master’s degree programmes

These degree programmes consist of 60 ECTS credits and contain:
    • A number of compulsory modules corresponding to 30-45 ECTS credits which constitute the identity and qualification profile of the programme.

    • A final Master’s project corresponding to 15 ECTS credits which documents that the level set for the programme has been achieved in a topic that has been approved by the university.

    • Perhaps 15 ECTS of elective courses or specialisation modules. If the programme includes specialisation modules, the Master’s project must be within the field of the specialisation in question.

The programme is organised in the form of part-time teaching within a time frame of up to three years, but may also be organised in the form of full-time teaching within a time frame of one year. 

Part-time degree programmes must be organised in such a way that people who have full-time employment can attend them

Courses and elective courses

Courses and elective courses

    • Courses and elective courses generate 10, 15, 20 or 30 ECTS credits. The departments must assess the potential for turning small courses into larger courses to reduce the intensity of the students’ studies.

    • All courses and elective courses must be given a full name in both Danish and English, no matter what language they are conducted in. This is because these names will be used on exam certificates.    

    • Courses and elective courses must contain a description of:

    1. The course objectives

    2. The learning outcomes in the form of precise academic objectives (6-8 bullet points) covering knowledge, skills and competences, as well as criteria for assessing the fulfilment of the academic objectives    

    3. The number of ECTS credits generated

    4. The forms of teaching and working methods

    5. Their chronology

    6. Prerequisites for participation (if any)

Elective courses

  • All Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programmes must contain elective courses of at least 10 ECTS credits. Students must be allowed a choice between at least two elective courses with two unique sets of academic objectives. Elective courses are not required on supplementary subjects and professional Master’s degree programmes.

  • The academic regulations must reveal the student’s options and selection criteria for elective subjects. This includes the option of choosing courses from a different degree programme at a university in Denmark or abroad.   

Major written assignments

Bachelor’s degree programmes    

  • The Bachelor’s project is compulsory (15 ECTS), graded, subject to external assessment, and placed on the fifth semester. It must demonstrate the student’s ability to identify, analyse and process issues relating to a defined topic within the field of study. 

  • The topic field for the Bachelor’s project is subject to the approval of the university.

  • The project involves the production of a home assignment on a topic chosen by the student. The same form of examination is used for the re-examination.    
  • The Bachelor’s project must always include a summary in a foreign language. The academic regulations must state the foreign language(s) in which the summary can or must be written. If the Bachelor’s project is written in a foreign language other than Norwegian or Swedish, the summary can be written in Danish.

  • The total length of the Bachelor’s project must be stated, including the length of the summary and whether the summary is included in the total length of the Bachelor’s project.    
  • The academic regulations must also explain the way in which the summary will be included in the overall assessment of the exam performance.

  • The student’s spelling and fluency must always be included in the assessment. The academic regulations must explain how this will be done.        

Master’s degree programmes

  • The Master’s thesis is compulsory (30 ECTS), graded, subject to external assessment, and placed on the fourth semester. It must demonstrate the student’s ability to use academic theories and methods while working on a defined topic within the field of study. 
  • The thesis statement for the Master’s thesis is subject to the approval of the university.
  • In most cases, one of the following three forms of examination must be chosen:
 
 
  1. Monograph (home assignment on a topic chosen by the student)
  2. Product thesis (home assignment on a topic chosen by the student with a product, and perhaps an oral defence)
  3. Portfolio (home assignment)
 
 
  • The thesis must always include a summary in a foreign language. The academic regulations must state the foreign language(s) in which the summary can or must be written. If the Master’s thesis is written in a foreign language other than Norwegian or Swedish, the summary can be written in Danish.
  • The total length of the Master’s thesis must be stated, including the length of the summary and whether the summary is included in the total length of the thesis.
  • The academic regulations must also explain the way in which the summary will be included in the overall assessment of the exam performance.
  • The student’s spelling and fluency must always be included in the assessment. The academic regulations must explain how this will be done.    

 

Professional Master’s degree programmes    

  • The Master’s project is compulsory (15 ECTS), graded, subject to external assessment and placed on the second semester.

  • The Master’s project must always include a summary in a foreign language. The academic regulations must state the foreign language(s) in which the summary can or must be written. If the Master’s project is written in a foreign language other than Norwegian or Swedish, the summary can be written in Danish.

  • The total length of the Master’s project must be stated, including the length of the summary and whether the summary is included in the total length of the project. 

  • The academic regulations must also explain the way in which the summary will be included in the overall assessment of the exam performance.

  • The student’s spelling and fluency must always be included in the assessment.     

Assessment

Bachelor’s degree programmes and Bachelor’s supplementary subjects

  • No more than one-third of the total ECTS credits for the programme may be assessed as “pass/fail”, which means that:
    • No more than 45 ECTS of the core subject may be assessed as “pass/fail”.
    • No more than 15 ECTS of the supplementary subject may be assessed as “pass/fail”.
  • Introductory courses are not included in this calculation.

Master’s degree programmes and Master’s supplementary subjects

  • No more than one-third of the total ECTS credits for the programme may be assessed as “pass/fail”, which means that:
    • Line A: No more than 40 ECTS may be assessed as “pass/fail”.

    • B line: Core subject: No more than 30 ECTS can be assessed as “pass/fail”.

    • Supplementary subject: No more than 10 ECTS can be assessed as “pass/fail” (supplementary subjects with an extension: no more than 20 ECTS).

 

Professional Master’s degree programmes

  • No more than one-third of the total ECTS credits for the programme may be assessed as “pass/fail”, which means that:
    • No more than 20 ECTS can be assessed as “pass/fail”.

Co-examiners

Bachelor’s degree programmes and Bachelor’s supplementary subjects

  • At least one-third of the total ECTS credits for the programme are assessed externally, which means that:

    • At least 45 ECTS of the core subject must be assessed by an external co-examiner.
    • At least 15 ECTS of the supplementary subject must be assessed by an external co-examiner.
  • Introductory courses are not included in this calculation.

 

Master’s degree programmes and Master’s supplementary subjects

  • At least one-third of the total ECTS credits for the programme are assessed externally, which means that:
    • Line A: At least 40 ECTS must be assessed by an external co-examiner.
    • B line: Core subject: At least 30 ECTS must be assessed by an external co-examiner.
    • Supplementary subject: At least 10 ECTS must be assessed by an external co-examiner (supplementary subjects with an extension: at least 20 ECTS).
 

Professional Master’s degree programmes

  • At least one-third of the total ECTS credits for the programme are assessed by an external examiner, which means that:

    • At least 20 ECTS must be assessed by an external co-examiner.

Exams

General information about exams

  • The purpose of exams is to assess the extent to which the student has achieved the academic objectives stated in the academic regulations for the courses/course elements concerned. The final exam provides the basis for the award of an exam certificate.
  • There is only one form of examination for each course.
  • This form of examination must be described clearly, precisely and unambiguously

Variation in forms of examination

  • Degree programmes must include a variety of forms of examination reflecting the content of the teaching and the working methods:

    • There must be alignment between the qualification framework, qualification profile, purpose, academic objectives, form of teaching and forms of examination (including re-examinations).
    • The ECTS weighting must match the workload.

Choosing forms of examination

  • The following forms of examination can be chosen: Home assignment on a topic chosen by the student (perhaps including a product), home assignment on a set topic, oral (with or without preparation), oral with a synopsis, written with invigilation, portfolio, participation in the teaching.    

Participating in the teaching

  • Participation in the teaching as a form of examination: Assessed by the teacher (no co-examiner) as either pass or fail.
  • The requirements for participating in the teaching must be specified (both scope and content). A form of re-examination must also be defined.
  • Prerequisites for participating in the teaching: The requirements for participating in the teaching must be specified (both scope and content). A form of re-examination must also be defined.    

Group exams

  • Relevant provisions (including length) must be stated for group exams. The following points must be stated: the contribution of each group member must be a separate and identifiable entity, the exam will be assessed individually, and there is a specified limit to the size of the shared contributions of the individual group members.
  • The number of students allowed in a group must also be stated.
  • For oral group examinations, the duration of the examination is adjusted to match the number of students.
  • It must be possible to take the re-examination individually. So if the ordinary exam can only be taken in groups, a form of re-examination which can be taken individually must be defined.

Re-examinations

  • The form of re-examination should be chosen based on whether it can be conducted in the shorter time available.    

Supplementary subjects

  • The exam on the fifth semester must be a portfolio exam or similar form of exam which is included in the course teaching.    

Language of exam

Reading texts in foreign languages    

The academic regulations must state whether students need to read texts in foreign languages, as well as stating how much knowledge of the foreign language(s) concerned the students will need.     

Language of exam

The academic regulations must state the language in which exams will be conducted. The following rules apply to the language of exams and teaching in relation to the language in which the degree programme is conducted:

Language of
degree programme or line

Language of teaching
on a course

As a general rule,
the language of the
exam must be:

can be:

Danish

Danish

Danish

English if the teacher allows this

English

English

Danish if the teacher allows this    

English

 

English

English

Danish if the teacher allows this    

Project placements

Project placements:

  • If a degree programme includes a project placement, the academic regulations must comply with the following requirements:

    • A project placement is an integral part of the degree programme to which it belongs and ends with an exam. The academic regulations state the number of ECTS credits and the learning outcomes.

    • The university must ensure that students achieve the required learning outcomes during project placements. The university also provides students with academic guidance as part of the process.

    • Project placements that take place in association with areas outside the university are subject to the approval of the university before students start them. The university will only approve such project placements if they are academically relevant for the degree programme concerned and can be arranged within the standard duration of this programme.

NB! Project placements may not be included in professional Master’s degree programmes.

Off-site teaching

Off-site teaching

  • If a degree programme includes off-site teaching, the academic regulations must specify:    

    • The degree programme elements (in terms of ECTS credits) which will be taken at the Danish university and at the educational institution abroad.

    • Special rules about teaching, the conduct of exams and other issues relating to degree programme elements that are to be taken abroad.

  • The Danish university must ensure that:

    • The degree programme complies with Danish rules in terms of its structure and other issues.    

    • The teaching abroad is structured specifically for the students admitted to the degree programme (for example, the Danish university decides the requirements relating to the academic content of the teaching, the conduct of exams etc.).

    • Degree programmes involving off-site teaching must state this fact clearly with a view to informing applicants that part of their degree programme must be taken abroad.

  • Off-site teaching may not exceed 60 ECTS credits of the programme elements on Bachelor’s degree programmes, and 30 ECTS credits of the programme elements on Master’s degree programmes.

NB! Off-site teaching is not permitted on professional Master’s degree programmes.    

Programmes preparing students to teach at upper-secondary school level

Programmes preparing students to teach at upper-secondary school level

  • The academic regulations for degree programmes preparing students to teach at upper-secondary school must comply with the following requirements:
    • Degree programmes conducted by the university which prepare students to teach at upper-secondary school level must ensure that the students gain academic qualifications in two subjects (core subject and subsidiary subject) which are taught at upper-secondary level, irrespective of the university at which the Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programmes have been taken. This will enable graduates to comply with the minimum academic requirements.

NB! Professional Master’s degree programmes do not qualify students to teach upper-secondary school subjects, so the minimum academic requirements do not apply to them.